Acupuncture, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and the Brain

A study on acupuncture for carpal tunnel syndrome focusing on how acupuncture works via its effects on the brain was recently completed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.  Acupuncture was found to be effective for carpal tunnel, and the acupuncture treatments induced changes in the somatosensory cortex of the brain.  Results were published in the neurology journal Brain.  Various articles about the study followed: Boston Magazine discussed the study in Acupuncture Actually Works, According to MGH Research; The New York Times elaborated on the study in the article Acupuncture Can Ease Wrist Pain of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; and Time Magazine explained the study The Weird Way Acupuncture Helps Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

New Guidelines for the Treatment of Low Back Pain Include Acupuncture

The American College of Physicians recently issued new guidelines for the treatment of low back pain, which include acupuncture.  More details are given by this article by The Annals of Internal Medicine.

Here’s a great video from CBS news and another from NBC news highlighting the new guidelines.

Low back pain is one of the most common conditions we treat at Acupuncture Together, often with good success.  We’re pleased to know that acupuncture and other non-invasive, low-risk treatments are being recommended.

Acupuncture for Self Care

Self care has become a trendy phrase, but it shouldn’t be considered a fad; rather, learning to be in touch with our physical and emotional needs and providing our bodies with timely care is a healthy long-term goal to have. Some self care is preventive (eating a balanced diet; regular exercise; getting enough sleep) and some is responsive (getting extra rest when you’re sick).
Where does acupuncture fit in? Acupuncture can be used as both preventive and responsive self care. Many of our patients find a weekly, biweekly or monthly acupuncture session to be a healthy preventive method of self care that keeps them feeling more relaxed, better able to cope with stress, sleeping more soundly or experiencing less pain. Others are so relieved when they can pop in for an acupuncture treatment on short notice for any number of things: relief after a stressful day, fatigue, a headache or migraine, acute pain, etc.
You can add acupuncture to your self care tool kit with other methods such as exercise, a warm bath or a nap. When your body is telling you it needs some relief, acupuncture may be just the thing that can help!

Staying Healthy and Relaxed This Holiday Season

In Chinese medicine we talk about causes of disease and health imbalances in terms of “excess” and “deficiency.”  The holiday season is typically a time of excess:Acupuncture T 2016-318

  • Excess indulgence of rich foods, drinks and alcohol
  • Excess activity: running around shopping, attending parties and social events, cooking, cleaning, hosting parties and house guests, traveling, etc.
  • Excessive stress and emotions that often occur at this time of year: difficult family dynamics; feelings of sadness, loss and grief that may come up when we find ourselves missing loved ones during this time; Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – aka the winter blues; and societal pressure for this to be “the most wonderful time of the year” when we just aren’t feeling that way.

All of this excess can then cause deficiency – or depletion – of energy and/or motivation, or a mix of stress (excess) and fatigue (deficiency).  We may feel drained, exhausted, unmotivated and/or depressed, or perhaps we feel “wired and tired,” revved-up but unable to wind down, with restless sleep or insomnia at night and adrenaline keeping us going during the day masking the underlying fatigue.  Maybe we feel sluggish or our digestion is off-kilter.

Our activities and our emotions are intertwined and the great thing about Chinese medicine is that it addresses all of these issues at the same time.  Acupuncture can help us feel more balanced at times when we may be experiencing highs and lows by calming the nervous system and releasing our own endogenous opioids, helping us to experience a feeling of well-being and calm.  Enjoy a happier, more relaxing and balanced holiday season with acupuncture.

Acupuncture in Recent News: Back Pain, Knee Osteoarthritis & Fertility

A recent review by the NIH found acupuncture to be an effective treatment for back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee.  This is no surprise to us!  We’re happy to say we frequently treat all kinds of pain conditions with acupuncture and in the majority of cases it is helpful.  We think this study is great because it acknowledges and promotes the use of acupuncture and other non-drug approaches for pain management.  The study may encourage more doctors to recommend acupuncture to patients seeking pain relief and may help patients cut back on pain medication usage.

An OB-GYN maternal fetal medicine specialist published this recent opinion article recommending acupuncture for fertility.  This is a very positive article, and we’re very happy to say that we’ve seen many of our patients using acupuncture for infertility who went on to become pregnant and deliver healthy babies!  The author, Dr. Clark, highlights the stress and emotional difficulties around infertility and the role of acupuncture in harmonizing the mind and body.  Acupuncture not only helps with the physiological aspects of fertility, it also helps with stress reduction and feelings of well-being, and these in turn can help promote fertility.

Late Summer and Fall Allergy prevention

LATE SUMMER & FALL ALLERGY PREVENTION

If you suffer from allergies to ragweed pollen and mold, the 2 most common late summer and fall allergens in Massachusetts, now is a good time to get acupuncture for management and reduction of allergy symptoms.  Acupuncture can help reduce and relieve allergy symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, sneezing and itchy, watery eyes.

Starting acupuncture once a week now, before allergy season is at its peak, can help to reduce the severity of allergy symptoms by strengthening your body’s resistance and immune function.  During allergy season it is recommended to get acupuncture once a week for mild symptoms, twice a week for moderate symptoms or 3 times a week for severe symptoms – or to combine some over the counter herb pills with acupuncture 1-2 times a week.  We have 3 types of helpful over-the-counter herbs available for allergies, so please ask us about them if you’re interested and we’ll point out the ones that will be right for you.

5 Community Acupuncture Tips

Whether you’re new to community acupuncture or an experienced recliner, we’d love to share some helpful community acupuncture tips to make your experience the best it can be:

  1. MAKE YOURSELF COMFORTABLE:  Acupuncture T 2016-326You’ll be resting and relaxing in a recliner chair for 30 minutes or more.  Please make yourself comfortable before we get started.  Being uncomfortable is counterproductive, so get yourself into a position that feels good.  Some people simply sit in a chair and are ready to go.  Others like to grab a pillow to put under their knees or a towel to roll behind their necks; feel free to help yourself to either or both.  Enjoy our quiet mellow music, or, if you prefer, you can help yourself to some earplugs if you want silence or bring in your own headphones and listen to your own music, podcast or guided meditation.
  2. 30 MINUTES IS ALL YOU NEED:  We know that many people have very busy lives and it can be hard to find the time for everything, including acupuncture.  Did you know that just 30 minutes is all you need?  While you’re welcome to stay longer, space and closing time permitting, 30 minutes is enough time to get the maximum benefit from acupuncture.  If you need to leave at a certain time, please let us know and we’ll be back to remove your needles at that time.  Get in, get acupuncture and get out!
  3. FEEDBACK IS HELPFUL: We’ll be asking you how you feel at each acupuncture treatments so that we know how you’ve responded to prior treatments and have a good sense of your overall progress.  Let us know what has changed and what hasn’t, or if there’s something new that you’d like us to treat.  Loved your last treatment?  Let your acupuncturist know and we’ll repeat it!  Does everything feel comfortable when your needles are inserted?  If not, please tell us so that we can fix it and you can relax.  We want to be sure that you enjoy your time being treated and experience good results.  Your feedback will help your acupuncturist craft more effective treatments.
  4. QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR PROGRESS? ASK US!:  As you make progress in reducing the severity of your main health concerns you may be ready to reduce the frequency of your treatments.  If you arrive for an acupuncture follow-up with a new health concern you may need to adjust the frequency of treatments to address it properly.  If at any time you’re not sure how frequently to be treated, please ask an acupuncturist.  You’re welcome to speak with us anytime you have an acupuncture follow-up, but if you’d like to talk a bit more in-depth about your progress or about new health concerns you can schedule an acupuncture with re-evaluation appointment.  We also have handy “How Often Should I Get Acupuncture?” charts available in the reception area and treatment room, so help yourself anytime for more info and detailed recommendations.
  5. ACUPUNCTURE MAINTENANCE:  Feeling great?  Keep it that way!  Once your health conditions have improved you can get acupuncture 2-4 times per month or as needed for maintenance.  Make wellness treatments a part of your healthy self-care routine.
    Here are some benefits of maintenance acupuncture:Acupuncture T 2016-225
    -Reduce stress and anxiety
    -Improve sleep
    -Increase your energy
    -Boost your immune system
    -Keep aches and pains under control

We always aim to provide the best possible care and strive to make acupuncture work for you.